Society of Southwest Archivists

News

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 11 May 2022 5:01 PM | Perla Camacho-Cedillo (Administrator)

    Krishna Shenoy, Librarian/Archivist and John Slate, City Archivist, Dallas Municipal Archives. This is the fourth installment of a series of articles that commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Society of Southwest Archivists.

    The Southwestern Archivist’s past issues serve as a chronicle of SSA during its good and bad times, look at past challenges and concerns within the archives community, and record achievements among SSA’s members.

    SSA President A. Otis Hebert Jr. established the first issue of what was initially named “The Newsletter” in August 1973. The newsletter’s logo made its first appearance between 1976-1980 when Chris LaPlante of the Texas State Archives served as the editor.

    While David L. Chapman was editor between 1984-1997, Texas A&M’s Sterling C. Evans Library printed “The Newsletter” free of charge for SSA. Succeeding Chapman, Michael Heskett of the Texas State Library and Archives’ Local Records Division changed The Newsletter’s consecutive numbering system to the volume and issue number format we see today.

    Another editor who made a lasting impact on SSA’s publication was Leon C. Miller of Tulane University. During his editorship, with approval by the executive board in May 1990, the newsletter was released under its new title, The Southwestern Archivist. In addition to this new name, other features, such as identifying the authors of the articles published, were included.

    The Southwestern Archivist was traditionally printed and mailed to SSA members and institutions; consistent and generous advertising supported the newsletter’s professional design. It entered the digital age in 2003 when recipients were presented the option of receiving both the print and/or digital version of the newsletter.

    The newsletter’s content increased to include: coverage of local events, new exhibits, projects, employment opportunities, reports on national and international developments, archival publications, and notable changes in archival leadership across the region.

    Beginning in mid-2018, the editorial team switched from using InDesign to the streamlined and user-friendly LucidPress to design The Southwestern Archivist. This change improved the newsletter’s aesthetic quality and feel. A cover page was also added to the newsletter to give it the appearance of a journal. At this time, the “Talk Of The Region” section was added to distinguish articles about individual repositories from those covering a broader range of southwest institutions or areas.

    In 2020, Editor Nicholas Wojcik, Scholarly publishing Librarian at the University of Oklahoma Libraries, implemented a plan to change The Southwestern Archivist into a solely digital format as the print version was discontinued. During this time, Wojcik and the Diversity and Outreach Committee also began a bi-annual feature to highlight diverse collections and voices in archives. With this latest change, the digital only format allowed more editorial and creative freedom.

    Under the current leadership of Krishna Shenoy, Librarian/Archivist, The Southwestern Archivist is now published in color. This latest change coincides with SSA’s new branding scheme to create a more unified appearance across all SSA communication platforms. Published on a quarterly basis, the newsletter remains a principal means of communication to members about SSA’s activities and actions.

    Caption: Images in this blog post prior to 2003 are from the Society of Southwest Archivists Collection, Texas Collection and University Archives at Baylor University.

  • 18 Feb 2022 9:13 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    John Slate, 50th Anniversary Ad Hoc Committee Chair

    This is the third installment of a series of articles that commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Society of Southwest Archivists.

    In the past 50 years, SSA has welcomed speakers whose presentations encompass a variety of subjects, but ultimately express the importance of archives in the field of Humanities. A.M. Gibson was the featured speaker at SSA’s first annual meeting in 1973. A George L. Cross Research Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, Gibson’s speech focused on how archives were used for his Oklahoma and New Mexico history research. The following year, the president of the Society of American Archivists, F. Gerald Ham, served as the keynote speaker.


    Caption: SSA Annual Meeting 1988 at the University of Texas at Arlington. From left to right: university benefactor Jenkins Garrett; Archivist of the United States Don W. Wilson; University of Texas at Arlington Director of Libraries Charles B. Lowry; university benefactor Virginia Garrett; SAA Executive Director Donn C. Neal. Wilson and Neal were the featured speakers. (SSA Archives)

    A few celebrity VIPs have attended the Annual Meetings, such as Lady Bird Johnson’s appearance at the Lyndon Johnson Library and Museum during the 1980 Austin meeting. Archives professionals joined the trend of invited speakers, such as the Archivist of the United States, Don W. Wilson, who discussed the National Archives’ future. Execute Director Donn Neal of the Society of American Archivists followed with a presentation about the future of the archival profession. The 2006 meeting invited L. Reynolds Cahoon, Senior Advisor on Electronic Records at the National Archives. His topic of discussion involved the challenges of email and electronic records preservation.


    Caption: Dr. Matthew Whitaker, 2012 (photo by Jennifer Green)

    Some keynote speakers discussed the impact of archival enterprise on regions part of SSA, such as SSA founding member Leon Metz speaking about the History of El Paso at the 1994 meeting. In 2006, historian and author David Dorado Romo presented “Exploring the Different Layers of Micro-History”, a speech about the use of archival resources to uncover El Paso and Juarez cultural history.

    The trend of speakers has shifted to include a wider range of diverse backgrounds and experiences. Donald Harington, writer of “Ozark Surrealist”, spoke about how archives impacted his writing career at the 2000 meeting in Fayetteville. Brenda Toineeta Pipestem, chair of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian Board of Trustees, talked about repatriation at the 2016 Annual Meeting in Oklahoma City. In 2018, Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, a renowned scholar of Latina/o arts and culture, was invited to present at the San Antonio meeting.


    Caption: Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, 2018 (photo by Melissa Gonzales)

    Dr. Andrew Torget’s (University of North Texas) 2015 keynote made a strong impact when lighting struck the hotel the meeting was held at. Despite the venue’s loss of electricity that prevented his use of a digital presentation, a fitting example of a modern peril, Torget persevered with his speech on the “Promise and Perils of Digital Archives”.


    Caption: Michelle Light, 2019 (former), Director of Special Collections and Archives at the University of Nevada , Las Vegas (photo by SSA member)

  • 19 Nov 2021 9:25 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    Lilly Carrel, 50th Anniversary Ad Hoc Committee

    This is the second installment of a series of articles that commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Society of Southwest Archivists.

    What once began as a business meeting raffle during breakfast has transformed into the annual tradition known as SLOTTO. SLOTTO made its first mark in SSA’s history on May 20, 1993 with David Murrah hosting the raffle and raising $515 for the Herbert Scholarship.


    Caption: Charles Schultz, SSA President 1978-1980, with his “Bluebirds of Happiness” at SLOTTO in Fayetteville, AR, 2000. Photo: Shelly Kelly.

    The following year at SSA’s annual meeting in El Paso, Kim Allen Scott filled in as host, a role he would continue to undertake throughout the next decade. His weeks-long preparation served him well as he entertained attendees and helped drive up raffle ticket sales. Kim’s years in this role for the event would pay off in 2001 when he was presented the Distinguished Service Award. Since the beginning of SLOTTO in 1993 until 2001, up to $1,570 had been raised through the raffle.


    Caption: Long-time host, Kim Allen Scott, and Gerri Schaad at SLOTTO in Austin, TX, 1999. Photo: Shelly Kelly.

    SLOTTO’s tradition evolved as SSA leaders and members added prize runners, such as Mark Lambert who dressed up as Elvis Presley in 2002 to distribute winnings during the event. In the mid 2000s, John Slate, Robert Schaadt, and others took a turn at being hosts to introduce their own comedic talents to SLOTTO.


    Caption: LBJ bust, recurring SLOTTO prize, “The Louisiana Years.” January 2021. Photo: Mark E Martin.


    Caption: Buy SLOTTO Tickets! Bob Sloan, Tara Zachery Laver, and Cindy Smolovik. San Antonio, TX, 2004 SSA Annual Meeting. Photo: Shelly Kelly.

    In the following decade, Melissa Gonzales took on the emcee role, wearing costume concepts such as “Jock Jams” in 2015 and “I Dream of ‘Wonder Woman Genie’” in 2019. During this year, $2,700 was raised at SLOTTO.


    Caption: SLOTTO emcee, Melissa Gonzales, in “I Dream of ‘Wonder Woman’ Jeannie” costume, Tucson, AZ, 2019. Image courtesy of Melissa Gonzales.

    The year 2020 with COVID-19 brought some abrupt changes in the cancellation of SSA’s annual meeting and SLOTTO raffle. Both returned in 2021 as members adapted to the virtual world of remote meetings. Melissa committed to her hosting responsibilities for the fundraiser while wearing a crafted Moulin Rouge tiger costume, successfully bringing a comedic sense of normalcy and hope to attendees through the computer screen.

    SLOTTO returns to its roots in 2022 at SSA’s 50th anniversary annual meeting in Houston.

    Let Us Hear From You – Celebrate SSA’s 50th Anniversary

    What can you do to help? Send in your most memorable moments of SSA! Whether it took place this year, fifteen years ago, or fifty years ago, we want to know what memorable moments stand out when you think back over your SSA membership. Was there a particular session or workshop that changed the way you practiced Archives?

    Did something memorable happen at the annual meeting? How did you meet your best SSA friend? Whether it’s funny or sad, poignant or boring; we want to know your most memorable moments in SSA. Send memorable moments to John Slate john.slate@dallascityhall.com.


  • 06 Oct 2021 9:30 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    If you would like to serve, or know an ideal candidate, please submit your nominations for the following positions:

    Vice-President/President Elect (three year term-one as VP, one as President, and one as Immediate Past President)

    Executive Board (3 positions, two-year term)

    Nominating Committee (1 position, two-year term)

    Scholarship Committee (1 position, three-year term)

    Secretary (two-year term)

    The responsibilities of each position are outlined in the SSA Officer & Committee Procedures Manual.

    To submit a nomination or nominate yourself, please fill out this form: 2022 Nominations Form

    The deadline for submitted nominations is January 1, 2022.

    Remember, if you are a Certified Archivist, or are planning to become certified, participating in the leadership of a professional organization such as SSA will earn you recertification credit.


  • 10 Aug 2021 9:31 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    John Slate, Chair, 50th Anniversary Ad Hoc Committee

    This is the first installment of a series of articles that commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Society of Southwest Archivists.

    Let’s begin at the beginning! On May 5, 1972 thirty-five archivists, librarians, and historians met at the University of Texas at Arlington to form the Society. The group drafted a constitution and bylaws. According to Charles Schultz’ institutional history of SSA, attendees sought most of all to foster and promote cooperation within the archival profession as well as among the several professions interested in archives and manuscripts as creators, collectors, preservers, and users. Next they sought to provide opportunities for educational development, not only for archivists, but also for users of archives. They also wanted to advance what today would be called “best practices.”


    Caption: Clipping from the Arlington Daily News, Monday, May 8, 1972, courtesy of the SSA archives, Baylor University. “Historical Meeting – The first meeting of the Southwestern Archives Society was held recently at the University of Texas at Arlington. Among those in attendance were, left to right, Dr. Edwin A. Davis, Managing Editor of the “Louisiana Historian” at Louisiana State University; John M .Kinney, Director of the Texas State Archives; Samuel A. Sizer, Curator of Special Collections at the University of Arkansas; Robert L. Clark, Jr., Archivist for the State of Oklahoma, and Ivan D. Eyler, Regional Director of the National Archives and Records Service in Fort Worth.”

    The first roster of elected officers of the Society reads like a who’s who of the archives and history community of the Southwest. A. Otis Hebert, Jr., director of the Louisiana Department of Archives and Records was named president. Dr. Sandra Swickard Myres, associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington, was elected vice president. C. George Younkin, chief of the branch archives at the National Archives and Records Center at Fort Worth, was elected secretary – treasurer.

    The first board was composed of a number of legendary heavy hitters in the archives community. Sister M. Claude Lane, archivist of the Catholic Archives of Texas, and Chester V. Kielman, university archivist of the University of Texas at Austin were elected to two-year terms on the executive board. Leon Metz, local historian, author, and archivist at the University of Texas at El Paso, and Bob Clark, state archivist of Oklahoma were elected to one-year terms. SSA sponsors and funds the Sister M. Claude Lane, O.P., Memorial Award, presented annually since1974 by the Society of American Archivists. It is the only SAA award sponsored by a regional organization. SSA has also sponsored and awarded the A. Otis Hebert, Jr. Continuing Education Scholarship since 1977. This led up to our first annual meeting, which was held at the University of Oklahoma in Norman on June 7th and 8th, 1973. At that first meeting, presentations and discussion revolved around copyright law, preservation and conservation, arrangement and description, reference topics, microfilming, and photographic collections preservation and access.

    Let Us Hear From You – Celebrate SSA’s 50th Anniversary

    What can you do to help? Send in your most memorable moments of SSA! Whether it took place this year, fifteen years ago, or fifty years ago, we want to know what memorable moments stand out when you think back over your SSA membership. Was there a particular session or workshop that changed the way you practiced Archives?

    Did something memorable happen at the annual meeting? How did you meet your best SSA friend? Whether it’s funny or sad, poignant or boring; we want to know your most memorable moments in SSA. Send memorable moments to John Slate john.slate@dallascityhall.com.


  • 23 Nov 2020 9:33 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    On September 22, 2020, President Donald Trump issued Executive Order (13950) on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping. The Executive Order (EO) seeks to “combat offensive and anti-American race and sex stereotyping and scapegoating” and to end so-called “divisive concepts” such as “critical race theory,” “white privilege,” “intersectionality,” “systemic racism,” and “unconscious bias” covered in workplace trainings used by institutions receiving federal funding. The EO further establishes requirements aimed at “promoting unity in the Federal workforce,” by prohibiting messages in workplace trainings that imply “an individual, by virtue of their race or sex, is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.”

    The Society of Southwest Archivists (SSA) views this EO as a brazen effort to silence diversity, inclusion, and equity initiatives in the workplaces of our membership. Libraries and archives should not deny the lived experience of Black/Brown, Indigenous, and other people of color, nor cast aside scholarship and research into the history of race relations in the United States in order to receive critical federal funding. The archival records held by repositories across the American Southwest are frequently accessed to provide evidence of the formation and spread of institutionalized racism. This EO requires SSA archivists to ignore this reality and silence the past, thereby calling into question the relevance of maintaining historical records.

    SSA is committed to the long-term work of dismantling structural racism through the continued processes of education, listening, and action. We cannot remain neutral regarding EO13950 and its toxic and ahistorical approach to our country’s past and the complexities of its culture. We are dedicated to an inclusive archival profession that respects our BIPOC colleagues and supports the care of diverse archival holdings. We oppose EO 13950 and its efforts to divide archival workplaces.

  • 12 Nov 2020 9:39 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    Have you been following the Society of Southwest Archivists on Facebook and Twitter and wonder how you can suggest links or announcements of your own? Well, look no further, because the SSA Social Media Request Form is here for you!

    Suggestions can include articles about archivists, archives, or cultural heritage issues in the region; announcements; calls for proposals; professional development opportunities; job postings; and more! Note that job post requests must include salary information, posts may be edited for length, and submitted posts will be posted at the discretion of the Internet Outreach Committee.

    A permanent link to the form can be found on the Internet Outreach Committee page. Bookmark it now, and spread the word!

    Questions, post ideas, and job post requests may also be sent directly to SSAInternetOutreach@gmail.com

  • 13 Oct 2020 9:41 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    It’s time to submit nominations for SSA’s 2021 election! If you would like to serve, or know an ideal candidate, please submit your nomination via our web form on SSA’s home page. The deadline for submitted nominations is January 1, 2021.

    The SSA Nominating Committee is seeking candidates for the following positions in 2021:

    Vice-President/President Elect (three-year term-on as VP, one as President, and on as Immediate Past President)

    Executive Board (3 positions, two-year term)

    Nominating Committee (1 position, two-year term)

    Scholarship Committee (1 position, three-year term)

    Treasurer (two-year term)

    The responsibilities of each position are outlined in the SSA Officer & Committee Procedures Manual.

    To submit a nomination or nominate yourself, please fill out this form: 2021 Nomination Form

    Remember, if you are a Certified Archivist, or are planning to become certified, participating in the leadership of a professional organization such as SSA will earn you recertification credit. Thank you for your interest in supporting SSA!

  • 28 Sep 2020 9:42 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)


    Dr. David B. Gracy Faculty Profile photo

    The Society of Southwest Archivists has lost a powerful advocate for archives. Dr. David B. Gracy II died peacefully in his home in the early morning of Saturday, September 26.

    Dr. Gracy was many things to many people: an archives evangelist, a mentor, a teacher, a colleague, even a train conductor at times.

    Last year, at the Society of American Archivists annual meeting, Dr. Gracy gave a presentation and recorded an interview.

    The presentation he gave at SAA 2019, “Archival Perspectives – From Texas And Beyond” is, unfortunately only available to current SAA members.

    If you aren’t a current SAA member, he was also interviewed that same week on the podcast “An Archivist’s Tale.”

    Both recordings are filled with Dr. Gracy’s energy and signature quips. Hot Dog!

    If you have access to JSTOR, there is an entire journal volume of Information & Culture devoted to Dr. Gracy’s career.

    We encourage you to leave a remembrance wherever you feel comfortable, be it through his obituary website, SAA’s website, through social media, through an e-mail to a colleague, or just privately with a short moment of silence.

    And should you feel inclined, you can pay tribute to Dr. Gracy by contributing to the student scholarship named for him.

    Into the breach!

  • 31 Aug 2020 9:46 AM | Jaimi Parker (Administrator)

    The Society of Southwest Archivists opposes budget cuts that threaten the access to the research collections of the Birmingham Public Library.

    The Officers and Executive Board endorse the following letter of support. SSA will send our endorsement to the Mayor and City Council of Birmingham.

    If you would like to send your own email to the Birmingham City Council:


<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 

© Society of Southwest Archivists


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software